flex-health

SMO welcomes you to Flex Health, our official Health Page partner.

SMO health have teamed up with a leading health partner in the region to help you with any niggles you have and ensure you keep ahead of the game with fitness and health.

Flex Health isn’t just about reactive treatment, with the help of SMO, we’ll be sharing fitness routines, exercises, as well as guiding you to a healthy diet.

Flex Health LTD is a physiotherapy company and provider of health and wellbeing in Hull and East Yorkshire. We offer specialist musculoskeletal and neurological rehabilitation to address a wide array of injuries and conditions from our purpose built facility. Whether it is in a group class or a one-to-one consultation, we manage your symptoms with clinically led, research-based practice with the aim of reducing pain, restoring function and in turn improving health. As well as their personal skills, our team of physiotherapists and Graduate Sport Rehabilitators have the use of some of the industries latest medical and rehabilitation equipment including: Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) therapy, compex/neurological stimulators, Vertimax and industry leading ice/compression ‘squid’ machines.

With over 12 years working in professional sport and 4 years in neurological rehabilitation, we know our ‘consistent care’ philosophy works. Through our philosophy and the use of the latest research, we believe we can deliver an unrivalled treatment plan that is thorough and intensive to enable a quicker and better recovery. We have allied links with the regions leading surgeons and sports medicine doctors to aid your experience during the rehabilitation period. We believe in treating our patients like professional athletes in the sense we provide everyone the opportunity to receive highly available, highly monitored and continuous rehabilitation, coupled with hands on manual therapy.

A typical process of injury rehabilitation with Flex Health is as follows. Once our patients have completed the initial stages of the acute management (controlling inflammation and swelling) we then progress them as early as possible in the pool. This enables patients to achieve functional movements in a supported environment. From here, we then progress patients in to our functional gym. We devise functional rehabilitation sessions based on the patient’s goals, and use these to tailor an individual package for every patient.

We work with the areas leading sports persons; from professional sports such as boxing, motorcycling, football, rugby league and union, tennis and netball.

A typical process of neurological rehabilitation is as follows. A face-to-face, no obligations chat with our caring and devoted neuro team; where patients have the opportunity to meet and talk with other patients and share experiences. Next you will undergo an in-depth assessment so we can tailor your rehabilitation plan to your specific needs. We will then provide regular updates and progress reports to continually monitor your rehabilitation to illustrate where we need progress or change your sessions.

We work with a number of neurological patients including: Stroke rehabilitation, Multiple Sclerosis, Spinal Cord Injury (SCI), Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and brain recovery patients, Huntington’s Disease, Undiagnosed conditions, Medical negligence, Spinal Infection to name a few. We are happy to discuss with all neurological patients the benefits of exercise physiotherapy and how we can potentially help with your health.

We treat the following injuries:

  • Lower Back Pain
  • Whiplash
  • Joint pain (from neck to toes)
  • Trauma
  • Ligament Sprains

  • Post-Operative Rehabilitation
  • Overuse Injuries
  • Tendon injuries
  • Muscle Tears
  • Unexplained pain/discomfort

We have two clinics across East Yorkshire, with one being dedicated to Neurological conditions/injuries, providing the best technological care in the area. We use Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) bikes to enable our patients to activate and exercise muscles to improve mobility, strength and balance, otherwise not possible without the use of this equipment. This effective treatment method, coupled with our philosophy for delivering consistent, intensive treatment sees our patients improve week on week; making FES therapy and Flex Health an integral part of their lives.

Self Help Tips

How to treat a outside ankle pain

Symptoms

  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Tenderness to touch
  • The feeling of ‘instability’, usually seen in a grade 3 injury.

How to Treat

  • Compress the area, with a roll of tape if you have it.
  • Lots of ice, once an hour for 20 minutes.
  • If extremely painful on walking, do not walk on it and seek medical advice.

How to treat a inside ankle pain

Symptoms

  • Swelling
  • Bruising
  • Tenderness to touch
  • The feeling of ‘instability’, usually seen in a grade 3 injury.

How to Treat

  • Compress the area, with a roll of tape/bandage if you have it. Keep the compression on for 24 hours.
  • Lots of ice, once an hour for 20 minutes.
  • Try not to walk on the ankle/foot,
  • Seek medical advice.

How to treat a high ankle sprain

These injuries are very frequently misdiagnosed.

Symptoms

  • Pain on walking,
  • Pain on both pointing and flexing the foot.
  • Specific pain on the ‘high ankle, usually found just above the ankle joint.
  • A potential feeling of instability (usually seen in large sprains)
  • Bruising
  • Swelling (although sometimes not seen)

How to Treat

  • Compress the area, with a roll of tape/bandage if you have it. Keep the compression on for 24 hours.
  • Lots of ice, once an hour for 20 minutes.
  • These injuries are more severe than other ankle injuries and need to approached with caution, if you are in doubt, do not walk on the foot and mobilise with crutches.
  • Always seek medical advice.

How to treat ACL (anterior Cruciate ligament) injuries

Symptoms

  • Swelling (usually immediate)
  • Bruising
  • Tenderness to touch and stiffness
  • The feeling of ‘instability’
  • Reduced range of movement, patients cannot bend or straighten the knee.
  • Deep pain
  • Pain on walking
  • A popping/snapping sensation in the knee when the mechanism of injury occurs. (Collapse mechanism)
  • Usually sustained on a cut/turn.

How to Treat

  • Compress the area, with a roll of tape if you have it, immediately. Keep the compression on for 24 hours.
  • Lots of ice, once an hour for 20 minutes.
  • Do not walk on the injured knee, use crutches.
  • Always seek medical advice.
  • Will usually require surgery.

How to treat MCL (medial Collateral Ligament) injuries

Symptoms

  • Swelling (usually immediate)
  • Bruising
  • Tenderness to touch and stiffness
  • The feeling of ‘instability’ on the inside of the knee.
  • Reduced range of movement, patients cannot bend or straighten the knee.
  • Pain on the inside of the knee.
  • Pain on walking
  • Usually a ‘block’ tackle
  • Direct kick to the area.
  • Feeling of the knee ‘opening up’ on the inside.

How to Treat

  • Compress the area, with a roll of tape if you have it, immediately. Keep the compression on for 24 hours.
  • Lots of ice, once an hour for 20 minutes.
  • Do not walk on the injured knee, use crutches.
  • Always seek medical advice.

How to treat a LCL (Lateral Collateral Ligament) Injury

Symptoms

  • Bruising
  • Tenderness to touch and stiffness
  • The feeling of ‘instability’ on the outside of the knee.
  • Reduced range of movement, patients cannot bend or straighten the knee.
  • Pain on the outside of the knee.
  • Pain on walking
  • Usually contact tackle
  • Direct kick to the area.
  • Feeling of the knee ‘opening up’ on the outside.

How to Treat

  • Compress the area, with a roll of tape if you have it, immediately. Keep the compression on for 24 hours.
  • Lots of ice, once an hour for 20 minutes.
  • Do not walk on the injured knee, use crutches.
  • Always seek medical advice.

How to treat a PCL (posterior Cruciate Ligament) injury

Symptoms

  • Bruising
  • Tenderness to touch and stiffness
  • The feeling of ‘instability’ deep in the knee.
  • Reduced range of movement, patients cannot bend or straighten the knee.
  • Pain on walking
  • An extension based mechanism
  • Usually a direct blow to the knee, forcing it backwards.

How to Treat

  • Compress the area, with a roll of tape if you have it, immediately. Keep the compression on for 24 hours.
  • Lots of ice, once an hour for 20 minutes.
  • Do not walk on the injured knee, use crutches.
  • Always seek medical advice.

How to treat Meniscus/Cartilage injuries

Symptoms

  • Bruising
  • Tenderness to touch and stiffness
  • The feeling of ‘instability’ deep in the knee.
  • Reduced range of movement, patients cannot bend or straighten the knee.
  • Pain on walking
  • A locking sensation of the knee
  • A clicking sensation of the knee
  • Feeling of the knee ‘giving way’

How to Treat

  • Compress the area, with a roll of tape if you have it, immediately. Keep the compression on for 24 hours.
  • Lots of ice, once an hour for 20 minutes.
  • Do not walk on the injured knee, use crutches, if very severe.
  • Always seek medical advice.

What are the common causes of shoulder injury

  • Fall on to an outstretched arm
  • Direct impact to the shoulder
  • Unusual twist or bend to the shoulder
  • Repetitive use injury such as a tennis serve or passing a rugby ball.

Potential Injuries

  • Dislocation
  • Subluxation
  • Muscle strain
  • Tendon injury
  • Broken bone
  • Joint injury.

Symptoms

  • Bruising
  • Tenderness to touch and stiffness
  • The feeling of ‘instability’ deep in the shoulder.
  • Reduced range of movement, patients cannot bend or straighten the shoulder

How to Treat

  • Compress the area, with a roll of tape if you have it, immediately. Keep the compression on for 24 hours.
  • Lots of ice, once an hour for 20 minutes.
  • Seek medical advice.

Ask a Physio for Advice

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Please note, Flex Health will respond within working hours, which are Monday to Friday 8am - 8pm and Saturday to Sunday 8am - 2pm

Ian Henry of www.walkingfootball.com got in touch with us this week to share the aims and benefits of his site…